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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 | History

3 edition of Harvesting water and rationalization of agriculture in North Medieval India found in the catalog.

Harvesting water and rationalization of agriculture in North Medieval India

H. C. Verma

Harvesting water and rationalization of agriculture in North Medieval India

thirteenth-sixteenth centuries

by H. C. Verma

  • 298 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Anamika Publishers & Distributors in New Delhi .
Written in English

    Places:
  • India
    • Subjects:
    • Water harvesting -- India -- History.,
    • Runoff irrigation -- India -- History.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [151]-160) and index.

      StatementH.C. Verma.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsS619.W38 V47 2001
      The Physical Object
      Pagination170 p. :
      Number of Pages170
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL172728M
      ISBN 108186565841
      LC Control Number99953732

      Indian agriculture began by BCE on north-west India as a result of early cultivation of plants, and domestication of crops and animals. Settled life soon followed with implements and techniques being developed for agriculture. Double monsoons led to two harvests being reaped in one year. Indian products soon reached the world via existing trading networks and foreign crops were introduced. Historical Development of Rainwater Harvesting and Utilisation 10 urbanisation, agricultural intensification and water-intensive lifestyles is resulting in a global water crisis. In , at least billion of the world’s people - about in India meet their drinking water requirements from underground water sources such as hand pumps File Size: 2MB.

      Rainwater harvesting in Ancient Times and its Sustainable Modern techniques 1 / 5 Rainwater harvesting in Ancient Times and its Sustainable Modern techniques Dr. 1, l2 ABSTRACT In India water harvesting has been practised since time immemorial. References of this practice are found in ancient religions texts and history. In general, water harvesting is the activity of direct collection of rainwater. The collected rainwater can be stored for direct use or can be recharged into the groundwater. The water can be used for agriculture, gardening, livestock, etc. The harvested water can also be used for drinking water as well after purification is done.

        H C Verma is a renowned experimental physicist and published many books including, Concepts of Physics, Harvesting Water and Rationalization of Agriculture in North Medieval India: Thirteenth-sixteenth Centuries and more. If you are searching for the PDF download of H C Verma's solutions. Putting in place a first rain separator to divert and manage the first mm of rain. Filtering the water to remove solids and organic materials, storing the filtered water in appropriate devices and recharging the ground water through open wells, bore wells or percolation pits. Cost of water. In the Indian context, urban water is heavily.


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Harvesting water and rationalization of agriculture in North Medieval India by H. C. Verma Download PDF EPUB FB2

Harvesting water and rationalization of agriculture in North Medieval India: Thirteenth-sixteenth centuries Hardcover – Find all the books, read about the author, and : H.

C Verma. Get this from a library. Harvesting water and rationalization of agriculture in North Medieval India: thirteenth-sixteenth centuries. [H C Verma]. Harvesting water and rationalization of agriculture in North Medieval India: Thirteenth-sixteenth centuries Hardcover Concepts Of Physics Vol I & II With Solutions Of Both The Volumes.

However, in medieval times, cities in the Indian peninsula were functioning in a better way and with higher densities than today. This paper aims at answering the questions regarding the growth and sustenance of the concept of Green Urbanism in the settlements of medieval India Author: Fahad Zuberi.

India’s Traditional Water Harvesting Systems. The book has provided an impetus to researchers and policy makers to look at the science of the past and to implement it in finding answers for the emerging water crisis in developing countries.

Water and Agriculture in India “Status, Challenges and Possible Options for Action” 1. Introduction Water is a critical input into agriculture in nearly all its aspects having a determining effect on the eventual yield.

Good seeds and fertilizers fail to achieve their full potential if. Contribution of Rainwater Harvesting in Agriculture of Gujarat: A Case Study of Ahmadabad District Nilu Khan Research Scholar, Centre for Studies in Economics & Planning, School of Social Sciences, Central University of Gujarat, India Abstract: Rainwater harvesting (RH) is a new technique to conserve water and later use them in irrigation and.

Traditional rain water harvesting techniques and its applicability revised 19 November Watershed management in India has been defined as rational utilization of land and water, and water resources for optimurn, and sustained production with minimum hazards to natural resources.

conserving water for agricultural use, proper Cited by: 6. ADVERTISEMENTS: In this article we will discuss about the condition of agriculture in India during the medieval age. As at present, even during the medieval times India was pre­dominantly an agricultural country. The people produced suffi­cient to meet their requirements and were self-sufficient, except during famines, or other natural calamities.

Zabo The zabo (the word means 'impounding run-off') system is practiced in Nagaland in north-eastern India. Also known as the ruza system, it combines water conservation with forestry, agriculture and animal care. Villages such as Kikruma, where zabos are found even today, are located on a high ridge.

Though drinking water is a major problem, the area receives high rainfall. Agriculture, an important sector of our economy accounts for 14 per cent of the nation’s GDP and about 11 per cent of its exports.

India has the second largest arable land base ( million hectares) after US and largest gross irrigated area (88 milion hectares) in the world. Rice, wheat, cotton, oilseeds, jute, tea, sugarcane, milk and potatoes are the major agricultural commodities produced. Dry areas suffer not only from limited rainfall but also ‘natural leakage’—90% of rainwater is lost directly or indirectly, and is unavailable for agriculture or domestic use.

Water harvesting is a low-cost, easy-to-use, environmentally-friendly way to recover a large part of this lost water. The book describes the effects, both global and local, of water scarcity and explores the solutions, techniques, processes and wider impacts of rainwater harvesting, with an especial focus on.

Socioeconomic Aspects of Rainwater Harvesting (i) Roles of municipalities, NGOs and city dwellers in water management and rainwater harvesting (ii) Public awareness on rainwater harvesting 6. Rain Water Harvesting in India: Need, Methods and other Details. Water is an important natural resource and is the very basis of our life.

We use water for drinking, irrigation, industry, transport and for the production of hydro-electricity. Water is a cyclic resource which.

"Water harvesting is a critical issue in India given the existing scarcity and water quality problems experienced practically all over the country. The pattern of endowment of water resources and the long term predictions of deficits on per capita availability in different rainfall zones point Cited by:   The water needs of the crops are taken care of by collected rainwater.

This system of rainwater harvesting is designed to harvest surface runoff water for agriculture. The traditional method has been used by many villagers since the 15 th century and Bhati is trying to revive it. water harvesting entails the collection of rain where it falls in a scientific and con-trolled manner for future use.

RWH consists of rooftop water harvesting, water from open areas such as paved ways, parks, roads, fields and in lakes and ponds. Among the three projects initiated by the council, ‘Rainwater harvesting in rural Karnataka File Size: KB.

Harvesting water and rationalization of agriculture in North Medieval India: Thirteenth-sixteenth centuries Jan 1, by H. C Verma Hardcover. India was a cradle of civilization in the ancient world. An interesting feature of all ancient civilization was that its inhabitants realised the tremendous value of water in human life.

Each of these civilizations was located on the banks of a river or within a convenient distance from. India’s Water Conservation & Water Future – Water in India At am [ ] practices include, storage tanks, water pits, bamboo drip irrigation, katta, and step-wells (Ecodeaz).

Storage tanks have increased in popularity since they also help with any salinity issues.Sustainable Rain water Harvesting Techniques prevailing in Ancient India. 1Rashmi Dande, 2Archana Bele, 3P.P. Padgilwar, 4Nandini Kulkarni 1,2,3,4Priyadarshini Institute of Architecture & Design Studies, Nagpur.

Abstract - Watershed management in India has been defined as rational utilization of land and water, and water.Agricultural Administration 21 () Some Agricultural Policy Effects of Encouraging Water Harvesting in India D. Ray Wye College, University of London, Wye, Kent, Great Britain (Received: 3 April ) SUMMARY Rainwater harvesting is long established in India Cited by: 1.